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SET and SET SESSION

Sets session variables. The variable’s value is effective for the user’s current connection to the node, until the node is restarted.

Syntax

SET { [SESSION] variable_name } = value;

SET [SESSION] @@variable_name = value;
SET {CHARACTER SET 'charset_name' | NAMES {'charset_name'}};
SET PASSWORD FOR 'username'@'host' = PASSWORD('password');

Remarks

  • variable_name is the name of the session variable.
  • The @@variable_name syntax is supported for compatibility with some other database systems. This is similar to MySQL behavior.
  • See the engine variables overview for information about other ways to set variables.
  • The SESSION keyword is optional. Including it does not change this command’s behavior.
  • charset_name sets session system variables character_set_client and character_set_results to the given character set, and character_set_connection to the value of character_set_database. It may be quoted or unquoted. The default character set mapping can be restored by using value DEFAULT.
  • NAMES sets the session system variables: character_set_client, character_set_connection, and character_set_results to the given character set. charset_name may be quoted or unquoted. The default mapping can be restored by using value DEFAULT.
  • SET PASSWORD sets the user password. See SET PASSWORD topic for details.

Examples

Set Session Variable

The following example sets the session variable net_read_timeout and retrieves its value.

SET net_read_timeout = 5000;

Retrieve the session variable’s value:

SELECT @@net_read_timeout;

Set Character Set

SET CHARACTER SET is similar to SET NAMES. The following example sets the character set of the client to utf8.

SET CHARACTER SET 'utf8';
****
Query OK, 0 rows affected (13 ms)
SET NAMES 'utf8';
****
Query OK, 0 rows affected (25 ms)

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